About E.A.S.T

East Anglian Stitch Textiles (E.A.S.T) was formed in 1995 in response to a demand for a self-supporting framework for textile artists in East Anglia, UK.


The membership of this group commenced with ten artists and now has fifteen.


Since it's inception E.A.S.T has had a close relationship with Braintree District Museum where it meets monthly and held the first E.A.S.T exhibition in 1997.The group continues to be mentored by Anthea Godfrey, Artistic Director of the Embroiderer's Guild.

Monday, 29 May 2017

Textile Art based on Morocco

In April we had a lovely holiday in Morocco, We were in Marrakesh as well as the low Atlas mountains.
Here we are in the dyers souk in Marrakesh.
I loved the Islamic patterns and thought they could be useful inspiration for an exhibition coming up next year Kaleidoscope.
I started printing, this is acrylic on fabric to try out patterns. These results were good
I like to use naturally dyed fabric as I like the subtle colours and the sense of tradition but for this project brighter colours would be needed. So I have been experimenting with natural pigments, Many of these come from Morocco.
Unfortunately printing with these colours didn't work as well, I have mixed the pigments, or I should say ground the pigments into soya milk and guar gum, I also tried gum tragacantha. I should say that prints with stencils and thermo fax screens did work well. This is a print on fabric dyed with avocado skins and pits, that has been soaked in soya milk.
However I like the faded look, I normally concentrate on organic patterns and asymmetric shapes so this is a new departure.  This is the same print as above with satin stitch with some areas only partially stitched, I hope to create a faded, partially disintegrated look. This is a sample, I will be developing it into a new piece in the next few weeks or months. I will do another posting when it is finished so you can see.  

Monday, 8 May 2017

Amanda Clayton's talk

On 29th April I visited the Colchester and Colne branch of The Embroiderers'  Guild  to hear Amanda Clayton's talk My blue suitcase and as I sat on the train on my way home l looked at an everyday item that I had carried with me all day - my train ticket. 






Next morning, in my workroom, I decided I would try to add odd items from my snippets box to make something unique which I could  add to my ideas book.

The ticket was too shiny so I gave it a good rub with some emery paper and painted it with cold tea. In the box I found a piece of calico from the edge of an unsuccessful collagraph print and some pieces of organdie.  I worked two parallel lines of running stitch along the edge of the calico and ruched it up slightly so it fitted on the ticket and I tore the organdie in two and frayed it.  I held the fabric on the ticket with a line of open chain stitch using an un-dyed linen thread.  I thought the open chain stitch looked a bit like the railway lines but the line was broken to represent the fractured return journey.







I further enhanced the ticket with some strands of bronze thread, a couple of daisies from a ribbon and a button which hid the ticket logo - just a few hours playing which will help me to remember an inspiring  Saturday morning.



Tuesday, 2 May 2017

Hurry; you have just got time to visit!


JOSEF FRANK – PATTERNS – FURNITURE – PAINTING

Room setting with at least 7 different prints


You have just got time to see this exhibition at the Fashion and Textiles Museum in London http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/josef-frank-patterns-furniture-painting/ as it ends on May 7th but I would recommend you do so.  I came out feeling refreshed and rejuvenated by the colours and designs of Josef Frank’s work.

The work of the designer and artist Josef Frank (1885-1967) is shown in the first-ever UK exhibition of his textiles. The Austrian-born architect moved to Sweden in 1933, where he developed his colourful brand of modernism, working with Estrid Ericson on furniture, glassware, lighting and interior design ideas. Together they redefined what is regarded as Swedish Modern. This exhibition in association with MillesgĂ„rden, Stockholm highlights Frank’s vibrant fabric designs for Svenskt Tenn alongside a number of his previously unknown watercolours.
Huge colourful pink and orange flowers burst across the wall as you enter the show, and it’s difficult not to smile.
Following through one is encompassed by large drapes of colourful and exciting colour and pattern.
Close up all the detail can be seen.


Josef Frank was a mid century architect, furniture designer and fabric print designer. This show focuses on Joseph’s prints, along with a selection of his watercolours upstairs. When Frank retired he turned to watercolour painting instead. These were not so much to my taste; a contrast to the rich flora and fauna of his textiles, but from here a dramatic view of the prints below.
Images courtesy of The Fashion and Textiles Museum